My Journey to Self Respect How One Man Lost 70 Pounds and Reclaimed His Health

In Diet, Fitness, Health, Lifestyle by Greg Biggerstaff

Kevin Quinn, details the way he incorporates exercise with his two young kids, as well as his broader diet and exercise plans.
I was 6’1”, 260 pounds and I needed to make drastic changes. Fast.
“You’re a fat ass,” is what I heard him say. In reality, my doctor actually had a much more eloquent and scientific way of putting it. I was 6’1”, 260 pounds and I needed to make drastic changes. Fast. The most persuasive argument he made was that I should do it for my soon-to-be-born son. He asked about my diet, and I confessed to having no restrictions. He encouraged portion control and eliminating snacking, but his recommendations stopped there and I was unsure where to begin in the baffling world of diets. Then we spoke about exercise. My admission that my fitness routine consisted of a weekly co-ed slow pitch softball league was met with unfettered laughter.

My doctor said enough to frighten me, and I jumped on the high-protein, low-carb diet bandwagon and half-heartedly (pun intended) engaged in 15 minutes of aerobic exercise per day. The diet part was easy – I ate everything I was already eating, but took out the carbs. And the exercise…let’s just say I did it. I hated every second of it, and it totally sucked. But I did it.

After two months, I hit the lowest weight in my adult life: 215 pounds. And then, in what seemed like the blink of an eye, my first son was born, I gained 40 pounds, napping in my car replaced exercise time, and my all-protein diet, which I sporadically maintained to salvage some shred of dignity, had resulted in my cholesterol hitting a number that may have won me a trophy if I was gunning for NL batting champ. Instead, I was more likely to win a Trophy for Heart Implosion. Do they give those out?

I was in the habit of putting myself second (or third) – sacrificing everything, including my health, for my family. It’s a noble pursuit, to be sure, but not if you aren’t alive to watch your family grow.
I was demoralized. Not only had I come back full circle, but it was worse this time. At this point I was in the habit of putting myself second (or third) – sacrificing everything, including my health, for my family. It’s a noble pursuit, to be sure, but not if you aren’t alive to watch your family grow. I needed to take into account how to help my family in the long run. That meant prioritizing my diet and exercise, starting now.

I had to come up with a plan, and I knew it had to start with my eating. A clear indicator of this was the mountain of receipts for midnight stress burgers in my tax folder (which I thought, somehow, were deductible). I surmised that if I was able to lose a little weight or become healthier in general, exercise might feel like less of a chore. Also, I needed to find the right kind of exercise. If I could find a viable, sustainable plan for eating and for exercise, I knew I would have a shot at succeeding. And so my journey began.



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